TITLE: Back to the Beginning AUTHOR: Eugene Wallingford DATE: September 01, 2014 3:17 PM DESC: ----- BODY: August was quiet on my blog only because it was anything but quiet elsewhere. The department office had its usual August business plus a couple of new challenges thrown in. I spent one day on jury duty, one day in retreat with fellow department heads, and one day on a long bike ride. My older daughter was home for a few days before heading back to college for her senior year, and my younger daughter was preparing to leave for college for the first time. On top of that, I am teaching our intro course this fall. I have not taught intro since the fall of 2006, when I introduced media computation into our Java track. Before that we have to go back to the late 1990s to find me in front of a classroom full of students embarking on their first programming experience. I'm excited and a little apprehensive. There is great opportunity in helping students lay the foundation for the rest of their CS coursework. But there is also great risk. For the most part, these students have never worked with a floating-point number or a variable or an assignment statement, at least in the context of a programming language. How badly might I lead them astray? We now teach Python in this track. I could have used media comp as our organizing theme again, but the instructors who have been teaching in this track for the last few years have moved to a data manipulation them, using a textbook by Bill Punch and Rich Enbody. I decided to do the same. There is no sense in me disrupting the flow of the track, especially with the likelihood that I won't teach the course again in the spring. (In the interest of full disclosure, I told my students that Bill was one of my mentors in grad school at Michigan State.) The first week of class went well. As expected, the students reminded me how different teaching intro can be. There are so many ways for novices to interpret so many things... Type a simple expression or two into the Python shell, ask them what they think,and find out for yourself! Every teacher knows that the first day of class shatters any illusion we might have of teaching the perfect course. Such illusions are more common for me when I teach a course for the first time, or the first time in a long while. The upside of shattering the illusion is that I can move on to the daily business of getting better. At the end of our first lab session, I walked with one student as he was leaving the room. He had asked a few questions during the exercise. I asked how he felt, now that he had completed successfully his first lab as a CS major. "I am excited and scared," he said. "Scared has been keeping me away from computer science, but I know I have to try. I'm excited." I know exactly he how feels. I'm apprehensive, not in fearing failure or catastrophe, but in being aware that I must remain vigilant. When we teach, we affect other peoples' lives. Teaching a first course in the discipline, introducing students to a new set of ideas and way of thinking, is a multiplier on this effect. I owe it to these students to help them overcome their fears and realize their excitement. -----