TITLE: A Little CS Would Help a Lot of College Grads AUTHOR: Eugene Wallingford DATE: December 28, 2014 11:12 AM DESC: ----- BODY: I would love to see more CS majors, but not everyone should major in CS. I do think that most university students could benefit from learning a little programming. There are plenty of jobs not only for CS and math grads, but also for other majors who have CS and math skills:
"If you're an anthropology major and you want to get a marketing job, well, guess what? The toughest marketing jobs to fill require SQL skills," Sigelman says. "If you can ... along the peripheries of your academic program accrue some strong quantitative skills, you'll still have the advantage [in the job market]." Likewise, some legal occupations (such as intellectual property law) and maintenance and repair jobs stay open for long periods of time, according to the Brookings report, if they require particular STEM skills.
There is much noise these days about the importance of STEM, both for educated citizens and for jobs, jobs, jobs. STEM isn't an especially cohesive category, though, as the quoted Vox article reminds us, and even when we look just at economic opportunity, it misleads. We don't need more college science graduates from every STEM discipline. We do need more people with the math and CS skills that now pervade the workplace, regardless of discipline. As Kurtzleben says in the article, "... characterizing these skill shortages as a broad STEM crisis is misleading to students, and has distorted the policy debate." -----