TITLE: Computer Science Is Not That Special AUTHOR: Eugene Wallingford DATE: December 12, 2016 3:15 PM DESC: ----- BODY:
I'm reminded of a student I met with once who told me that he planned to go to law school, and then a few minutes later, when going over a draft of a lab report, said "Yeah... Grammar isn't really my thing." Explaining why I busted up laughing took a while.
When I ask prospective students why they decided not to pursue a CS degree, they often say things to the effect of "Computer science seemed cool, but I heard getting a degree in CS was a lot of work." or "A buddy of mine told me that programming is tedious." Sometimes, I meet these students as they return to the university to get a second degree -- in computer science. Their reasons for returning vary from the economic (a desire for better career opportunities) to personal (a desire to do something that they have always wanted to do, or to pursue a newfound creative interest). After you've been in the working world a while, a little hard work and some occasional tedium don't seem like deal breakers any more. Such conversations were on my mind as I read physicist Chad Orzel's recent Science Is Not THAT Special. In this article, Orzel responds to the conventional wisdom that becoming a scientist and doing science involve a lot of hard work that is unlike the exciting stuff that draws kids to science in the first place. Then, when kids encounter the drudgery and hard work, they turn away from science as a potential career. Orzel's takedown of this idea is spot on. (The quoted passage above is one of the article's lighter moments in confronting the stereotype.) Sure, doing science involves a lot of tedium, but this problem is not unique to science. Getting good at anything requires a lot of hard work and tedious attention to detail. Every job, every area of expertise, has its moments of drudgery. Even the rare few who become professional athletes and artists, with careers generally thought of as dreams that enable people to earn a living doing the thing they love, spend endless hours engaged in the drudgery of practicing technique and automatizing physical actions that become their professional vocabulary. Why do we act as if science is any different, or should be? Computer science gets this rap, too. What could be worse than fighting with a compiler to accept a program while you are learning to code? Or plowing threw reams of poorly documented API descriptions to plug your code into someone's e-commerce system? Personally, I can think of lots of things that are worse. I am under no illusion, however, that other professionals are somehow shielded from such negative experiences. I just prefer my pains to theirs. Maybe some people don't like certain kinds of drudgery. That's fair. Sometimes we gravitate toward the things whose drudgery we don't mind, and sometimes we come to accept the drudgery of the things we love to do. I'm not sure which explains my fascination with programming. I certainly enjoy the drudgery of computer science more than that of most other activities -- or at least I suffer it more gladly. I'm with Orzel. Let's be honest with ourselves and our students that getting good at anything takes a lot of hard work and, once you master something, you'll occasionally face some tedium in the trenches. Science, and computer science in particular, are not that much different from anything else. -----