TITLE: The Challenge Facing CS Education AUTHOR: Eugene Wallingford DATE: October 02, 2017 12:16 PM DESC: ----- BODY: Today and tomorrow, I am at a CS Education Summit in Pittsburgh. I've only been to Pittsburgh once before, for ICFP 2002 (the International Conference on Functional Programming) and am glad to be back. It's a neat city. The welcome address for the summit was given by Dr. Farnam Jahanian, the interim president at Carnegie Mellon University. Jahanian is a computer scientist, with a background in distributed computing and network security. His resume includes a stint as chair of the CS department at the University of Michigan and a stint at the NSF. Welcome addresses for conferences and workshops vary in quality. Jahanian gave quite a good talk, putting the work of the summit into historical and cultural context. The current boom in CS enrollments is happening at a time when computing, broadly defined, is having an effect in seemingly all disciplines and all sectors of the economy. What does that mean for how we respond to the growth? Will we see that the current boom presages a change to the historical cycle of enrollments in coming years? Jahanian made three statements in particular that for me capture the challenge facing CS departments everywhere and serve as a backdrop for the summit: Thus the idea of a CS education summit. I'm glad to be here. (*) In my experience, it is much more likely to find a person with a CS or math PhD and significant educational background in the humanities than to find a person with a humanities PhD and significant educational background in CS or math (or any other science, for that matter). One of my hopes for the current trend of increasing interest in CS among non-CS majors is that we an close this gap. All of the departments on our campuses, and thus all of our university graduates, will be better for it. -----