TITLE: Technology is a Place Where We Live AUTHOR: Eugene Wallingford DATE: March 12, 2018 3:43 PM DESC: ----- BODY: Yesterday morning I read The Good Room, a talk Frank Chimero gave last month. Early on in the talk, Chimero says:
Let me start by stating something obvious: in the last decade, technology has transformed from a tool that we use to a place where we live.
This sentence jumped off the page both for the content of the assertion and for the decade time frame with which he bounds it. In the fall of 2003, I taught a capstone course for non-majors that is part of my university's liberal arts core. The course, titled "Environment, Technology, and Society", brings students from all majors on campus together in a course near the end of their studies, to apply their general education and various disciplinary expertises to problems of some currency in the world. As you might guess from the title, the course focuses on problems at the intersection of the natural environment, technology, and people. My offering of the course put on a twist on the usual course content. We focused on the man-made environment we all live in, which even by 2003 had begun to include spaces carved out on the internet and web. The only textbook for the course was Donald Norman's The Design of Everyday Things, which I think every university graduate should have read. The topics for the course, though, had a decided IT flavor: the effect of the Internet on everyday life, e-commerce, spam, intellectual property, software warranties, sociable robots, AI in law and medicine, privacy, and free software. We closed with a discussion of what an educated citizen of the 21st century ought to know about the online world in which they would live in order to prosper as individuals and as a society. The change in topic didn't excite everyone. A few came to the course looking forward to a comfortable "save the environment" vibe and were resistant to considering technology they didn't understand. But most were taking the course with no intellectual investment at all, as a required general education course they didn't care about and just needed to check off the list. In a strange way, their resignation enabled them to engage with the new ideas and actually ask some interesting questions about their future. Looking back now after fifteen years , the course design looks pretty good. I should probably offer to teach it again, updated appropriately, of course, and see where young people of 2018 see themselves in the technological world. As Chimero argues in his talk, we need to do a better job building the places we want to live in -- and that we want our children to live in. Privacy, online peer pressure, and bullying all turned out differently than I expected in 2003. Our young people are worse off for those differences, though I think most have learned ways to live online in spite of the bad neighborhoods. Maybe they can help us build better places to live. Chimero's talk is educational, entertaining, and quotable throughout. I tweeted one quote: "How does a city wish to be? Look to the library. A library is the gift a city gives to itself." There were many other lines I marked for myself, including: Check the talk out for yourself. -----