March 31, 2014 3:21 PM

Programming, Defined and Re-imagined

By Chris Granger of Light Table fame:

Programming is our way of encoding thought such that the computer can help us with it.

Read the whole piece, which recounts Granger's reflection after the Light Table project left him unsatisfied and he sought answers. He concludes that we need to re-center our idea of what programming is and how we can make it accessible to more people. Our current idea of programming doesn't scale because, well,

It turns out masochism is a hard sell.

Every teacher knows this. You can sell masochism to a few proud souls, but not to anyone else.

Posted by Eugene Wallingford | Permalink | Categories: Computing, Software Development

March 29, 2014 10:06 AM


That is the advice I find myself giving to students again and again this semester: Sooner.

Review the material we cover in class sooner.

Ask questions sooner.

Think about the homework problems sooner.

Clarify the requirements sooner.

Write code sooner.

Test your code sooner.

Submit a working version of your homework sooner. You can submit a more complete version later.

A lot of this advice boils down to the more general Get feedback sooner. In many ways, it is a dual of the advice, Take small steps. If you take small steps, you can ask, clarify, write, and test sooner. One of the most reliable ways to do those things sooner is to take small steps.

If you are struggling to get things done, give sooner a try. Rather than fail in a familiar way, you might succeed in an unfamiliar way. When you do, you probably won't want to go back to the old way again.

Posted by Eugene Wallingford | Permalink | Categories: Patterns, Software Development, Teaching and Learning

March 18, 2014 2:30 PM

Deploy So That You Can Learn The Rest

In this interview prior to Monday's debut of FiveThirtyEight, Joe Coscarelli asked Nate Silver if the venture was ready to launch. Silver said that they they were probably 75-80% ready and that it was time to go live.

You're going to make some mistakes once you launch that you can't really deal with until you actually have a real product.

If they waited another month, they'd probably feel like they were ... 75-80% ready. There are some things you can't learn "unless your neck is on the line".

It ought not be surprising that Silver feels this way. His calling card is using data to make better decisions. Before you can have big data, or good data, you have to have data. It is usually better to start collecting it now than to start collecting it later.

Posted by Eugene Wallingford | Permalink | Categories: Software Development

March 14, 2014 3:47 PM

We're in a Dr. Seuss Book

Sass, Flexbox, Git, Grunt? Frank Chimero whispers:

(Look at that list, programmers. You need to get better at naming things. No wonder why people are skittish about development. It's like we're in a Dr. Seuss book.)

For new names, it's time to hunt.
I will not Git!
I will not Grunt!

Nevermore shall we let these pass.
No more Flexbox!
No more Sass!

Posted by Eugene Wallingford | Permalink | Categories: Software Development

March 12, 2014 3:55 PM

Not Content With Content

Last week, the Chronicle of Higher Ed ran an article on a new joint major at Stanford combining computer science and the humanities.

[Students] might compose music or write a short story and translate those works, through code, into something they can share on the web.

"For students it seems perfectly natural to have an interest in coding," [the program's director] said. "In one sense these fields might feel like they're far apart, but they're getting closer and closer."

The program works in both directions, by also engaging CS students in the societal issues created by ubiquitous networks and computing power.

We are doing something similar at my university. A few years ago, several departments began to collaborate on a multidisciplinary program called Interactive Digital Studies which went live in 2012. In the IDS program, students complete a common core of courses from the Communication Studies department and then take "bundles" of coursework involving digital technology from at least two different disciplines. These areas of emphasis enable students to explore the interaction of computing with various topics in media, the humanities, and culture.

Like Stanford's new major, most of the coursework is designed to work at the intersection of disciplines, rather than pursuing disciplines independently, "in parallel".

The initial version of the computation bundle consists of an odd mix of application tools and opportunities to write programs. Now that the program is in place, we are finding that students and faculty alike desire more depth of understanding about programming and development. We are in the process of re-designing the bundle to prepare students to work in a world where so many ideas become web sites or apps, and in which data analytics plays an important role in understanding what people do.

Both our IDS program and Stanford's new major focus on something that we are seeing increasingly at universities these days: the intersections of digital technology and other disciplines, in particular the humanities. Computational tools make it possible for everyone to create more kinds of things, but only if people learn how to use new tools and think about their work in new ways.

Consider this passage by Jim O'Loughlin, a UNI English professor, from a recent position statement on the the "digital turn" of the humanities:

We are increasingly unlikely to find writers who only provide content when the tools for photography, videography and digital design can all be found on our laptops or even on our phones. It is not simply that writers will need to do more. Writers will want to do more, because with a modest amount of effort they can be their own designers, photographers, publishers or even programmers.

Writers don't have to settle for producing "content" and then relying heavily on others to help bring the content to an audience. New tools enable writers to take greater control of putting their ideas before an audience. But...

... only if we [writers] are willing to think seriously not only about our ideas but about what tools we can use to bring our ideas to an audience.

More tools are within the reach of more people now than ever before. Computing makes that possible, not only for writers, but also for musicians and teachers and social scientists.

Going further, computer programming makes it possible to modify existing tools and to create new tools when the old ones are not sufficient. Writers, musicians, teachers, and social scientists may not want to program at that level, but they can participate in the process.

The critical link is preparation. This digital turn empowers only those who are prepared to think in new ways and to wield a new set of tools. Programs like our IDS major and Stanford's new joint major are among the many efforts hoping to spread the opportunities available now to a larger and more diverse set of people.

Posted by Eugene Wallingford | Permalink | Categories: Computing, General, Teaching and Learning

March 11, 2014 4:52 PM

Change The Battle From Arguments To Tests

In his recent article on the future of the news business, Marc Andreessen has a great passage in his section on ways for the journalism industry to move forward:

Experimentation: You may not have all the right answers up front, but running many experiments changes the battle for the right way forward from arguments to tests. You get data, which leads to correctness and ultimately finding the right answers.

I love that clause: "running many experiments changes the battle for the right way forward from arguments to tests".

While programming, it's easy to get caught up in what we know about the code we have just written and assume that this somehow empowers us to declare sweeping truths about what to do next.

When students are first learning to program, they often fall into this trap -- despite the fact that they don't know much at all. From other courses, though, they are used to thinking for a bit, drawing some conclusions, and then expressing strongly-held opinions. Why not do it with their code, too?

No matter who we are, whenever we do this, sometimes we are right, and sometimes, we are wrong. Why leave it to chance? Run a simple little experiment. Write a snippet of code that implements our idea, and run it. See what happens.

Programs let us test our ideas, even the ideas we have about the program we are writing. Why settle for abstract assertions when we can do better? In the end, even well-reasoned assertions are so much hot air. I learned this from Ward Cunningham: It's all talk until the tests run.

Posted by Eugene Wallingford | Permalink | Categories: General, Software Development, Teaching and Learning

March 08, 2014 10:18 AM

Sometimes a Fantasy

This week I saw a link to The Turing School of Software & Design, "a seven-month, full-time program for people who want to become professional developers". It reminded me of Neumont University, a ten-year-old school that offers a B.S. degree program in Computer science that students can complete in two and a half years.

While riding the bike, I occasionally fantasize about doing something like this. With the economics of universities changing so quickly [ 1 | 2 ], there is an opportunity for a new kind of higher education. And there's something appealing about being able to work closely with a cadre of motivated students on the full spectrum of computer science and software development.

This could be an accelerated form of traditional CS instruction, without the distractions of other things, or it could be something different. Traditional university courses are pretty confining. "This course is about algorithms. That one is about programming languages." It would be fun to run a studio in which students serve as apprentices making real stuff, all of us learning as we go along.

A few years ago, one of our ChiliPLoP hot topic groups conducted a greenfield thought experiment to design an undergrad CS program outside of the constraints of any existing university structure. Student advancement was based on demonstrating professional competencies, not completing packaged courses. It was such an appealing idea! Of course, there was a lot of hard work to be done working out the details.

My view of university is still romantic, though. I like the idea of students engaging the great ideas of humanity that lie outside their major. These days, I think it's conceivable to include the humanities and other disciplines in a new kind of CS education. In a recent blog entry, Hollis Robbins floats the idea of Home College for the first year of a liberal arts education. The premise is that there are "thousands of qualified, trained, energetic, and underemployed Ph.D.s [...] struggling to find stable teaching jobs". Hiring a well-rounded tutor could be a lot less expensive than a year at a private college, and more lucrative for the tutor than adjuncting.

Maybe a new educational venture could offer more than targeted professional development in computing or software. Include a couple of humanities profs, maybe some a social scientist, and it could offer a more complete undergraduate education -- one that is economical both in time and money.

But the core of my dream is going broad and deep in CS without the baggage of a university. Sometimes a fantasy is all you need. Other times...

Posted by Eugene Wallingford | Permalink | Categories: Computing, Software Development, Teaching and Learning

March 07, 2014 2:24 PM

Take Small Steps

If a CS major learns only one habit of professional practice in four years, it should be:

Take small steps.

A corollary:

If things aren't working, take smaller steps.

I once heard Kent Beck say something similar, in the context of TDD and XP. When my colleague Mark Jacobson works with students who are struggling, he uses a similar mantra: Solve a simpler problem. As Dr. Nick notes, students and professionals alike should scale the step size according to their level of knowledge or their confidence about the problem.

When I tweeted these thoughts yesterday, two pieces of related advice came in:

  • Slow down. -- Big steps are usually a sign of trying to hurry. Beginners are especially prone to this.

  • Lemma: Keep moving. -- Small steps keep us moving more reliably. We can always fool ourselves into believing that the next big step is all we need...

Of course, I've always been a fan of baby steps and unusual connections to agile software development. They apply quite nicely to learners in many settings.

Posted by Eugene Wallingford | Permalink | Categories: Software Development, Teaching and Learning

March 01, 2014 11:35 AM

A Few Old Passages

I was looking over a couple of files of old notes and found several quotes that I still like, usually from articles I enjoyed as well. They haven't found their way into a blog entry yet, but they deserve to see the light of day.

Evidence, Please!

From a short note on the tendency even among scientists to believe unsubstantiated claims, both in and out of the professional context:

It's hard work, but I suspect the real challenge will lie in persuading working programmers to say "evidence, please" more often.

More programmers and computer scientists are trying to collect and understand data these days, but I'm not sure we've made much headway in getting programmers to ask for evidence.

Sometimes, Code Before Math

From a discussion of The Expectation Maximization Algorithm:

The code is a lot simpler to understand than the math, I think.

I often understand the language of code more quickly than the language of math. Reading, or even writing, a program sometimes helps me understand a new idea better than reading the math. Theory is, however, great for helping me to pin down what I have learned more formally.

Grin, Wave, Nod

From Iteration Inside and Out, a review of the many ways we loop over stuff in programs:

Right now, the Rubyists are grinning, the Smalltalkers are furiously waving their hands in the air to get the teacher's attention, and the Lispers are just nodding smugly in the back row (all as usual).

As a Big Fan of all three languages, I am occasionally conflicted. Grin? Wave? Nod? Look like the court jester by doing all three simultaneously?

Posted by Eugene Wallingford | Permalink | Categories: Computing, Software Development, Teaching and Learning