March 22, 2018 4:05 PM

Finally, Some Good News

It's been a tough semester. On top of the usual business, there have been a couple of extra stresses. First, I've been preparing for the departure of a very good friend, who is leaving the university and the area for family and personal reasons. Second, a good friend and department colleague took an unexpected leave that turned into a resignation. Both departures cast a distant pall over my workdays. This week, though, has offered a few positive notes to offset the sadness.

Everyone seems to complain about email these days, and I certainly have been receiving and sending more than usual this semester, as our students and I adjust to the change in our faculty. But sometimes an email message makes my day better. Exhibit 1, a message from a student dealing with a specific issue:

Thank you for your quick and helpful response!
Things don't look so complicated or hopeless now.

Exhibit 2, a message from a student who has been taming the bureaucracy that arises whenever two university systems collide:

I would like to thank you dearly for your prompt and thorough responses to my numerous emails. Every time I come to you with a question, I feel as though I am receiving the amount of respect and attention that I wish to be given.

Compliments like these make it a lot easier to muster the energy to deal with the next batch of email coming in.

There has also been good news on the student front. I received email from a rep at a company in Madison, Wisconsin, where one of our alumni works. They are looking for developers to work in a functional programming environment and are having a hard time filling the positions locally, despite the presence of a large and excellent university in town. Our alum is doing well enough that the company would like to hire more from our department, which is doing a pretty good job, too.

Finally, today I spoke in person with two students who had great news about their futures. One has accepted an offer to join the Northwestern U. doctoral program and work in the lab of Kenneth Forbus. I studied Forbus's work on qualitative reasoning and analogical reasoning as a part of my own Ph.D. work and learned a lot from him. This is a fantastic opportunity. The other student has accepted an internship to work at PlayStation this summer, working on the team that develops the compilers for its game engines. He told me, "I talked a lot about the project I did in your course last semester during my interview, and I assume that's part of the reason I got an offer." I have to admit, that made me smile.

I had both of these students in my intro class a few years back. They would have succeeded no matter who taught their intro course, or the compiler course, for that matter, so I can't take any credit for their success. But they are outstanding young men, and I have had the pleasure of getting to know over the last four years. News of the next steps in their careers makes me feel good, too.

I think I have enough energy to make it to the end of the semester now.

Posted by Eugene Wallingford | Permalink | Categories: General, Personal, Teaching and Learning

March 12, 2018 3:43 PM

Technology is a Place Where We Live

Yesterday morning I read The Good Room, a talk Frank Chimero gave last month. Early on in the talk, Chimero says:

Let me start by stating something obvious: in the last decade, technology has transformed from a tool that we use to a place where we live.

This sentence jumped off the page both for the content of the assertion and for the decade time frame with which he bounds it. In the fall of 2003, I taught a capstone course for non-majors that is part of my university's liberal arts core. The course, titled "Environment, Technology, and Society", brings students from all majors on campus together in a course near the end of their studies, to apply their general education and various disciplinary expertises to problems of some currency in the world. As you might guess from the title, the course focuses on problems at the intersection of the natural environment, technology, and people.

My offering of the course put on a twist on the usual course content. We focused on the man-made environment we all live in, which even by 2003 had begun to include spaces carved out on the internet and web. The only textbook for the course was Donald Norman's The Design of Everyday Things, which I think every university graduate should have read. The topics for the course, though, had a decided IT flavor: the effect of the Internet on everyday life, e-commerce, spam, intellectual property, software warranties, sociable robots, AI in law and medicine, privacy, and free software. We closed with a discussion of what an educated citizen of the 21st century ought to know about the online world in which they would live in order to prosper as individuals and as a society.

The change in topic didn't excite everyone. A few came to the course looking forward to a comfortable "save the environment" vibe and were resistant to considering technology they didn't understand. But most were taking the course with no intellectual investment at all, as a required general education course they didn't care about and just needed to check off the list. In a strange way, their resignation enabled them to engage with the new ideas and actually ask some interesting questions about their future.

Looking back now after fifteen years , the course design looks pretty good. I should probably offer to teach it again, updated appropriately, of course, and see where young people of 2018 see themselves in the technological world. As Chimero argues in his talk, we need to do a better job building the places we want to live in -- and that we want our children to live in. Privacy, online peer pressure, and bullying all turned out differently than I expected in 2003. Our young people are worse off for those differences, though I think most have learned ways to live online in spite of the bad neighborhoods. Maybe they can help us build better places to live.

Chimero's talk is educational, entertaining, and quotable throughout. I tweeted one quote: "How does a city wish to be? Look to the library. A library is the gift a city gives to itself." There were many other lines I marked for myself, including:

  • Penn Station "resembles what Kafka would write about if he had the chance to see a derelict shopping mall." (I'm a big Kafka fan.)
  • "The wrong roads are being paved in an increasingly automated culture that values ease."
Check the talk out for yourself.

Posted by Eugene Wallingford | Permalink | Categories: Computing, General, Teaching and Learning

March 06, 2018 4:11 PM

A Good Course in Epistemology

Theoretical physicist Marcelo Gleiser, in The More We Know, the More Mystery There Is:

But even if we did [bring the four fundamental forces together in a common framework], and it's a big if right now, this "unified theory" would be limited. For how could we be certain that a more powerful accelerator or dark matter detector wouldn't find evidence of new forces and particles that are not part of the current unification? We can't. So, dreamers of a final theory need to recalibrate their expectations and, perhaps, learn a bit of epistemology. To understand how we know is essential to understand how much we can know.
the table of contents from PHL 440's readings

People are often surprised to hear that, in all my years of school, my favorite course was probably PHL 440 Epistemology, which I took in grad school as a cognate to my CS courses. I certainly enjoyed the CS courses I took as a grad student, and as an undergrad, too, and but my study of AI was enhanced significantly by courses in epistemology and cognitive psychology. The prof for PHL 440, Dr. Rich Hall, became a close advisor to my graduate work and a member of my dissertation committee. Dr. Hall introduced me to the work of Stephen Toulmin, whose model of argument influenced my work immensely.

I still have the primary volume of readings that Dr. Hall assigned in the course. Looking back now, I'd forgotten how many of W.V.O. Quine's papers we'd read... but I enjoyed them all. The course challenged most of my assumptions about what it means "to know". As I came to appreciate different views of what knowledge might be and how we come by it, my expectations of human behavior -- and my expectations for what AI could be -- changed. As Gleiser suggests, to understand how we know is essential to understanding what we can know, and how much.

Gleiser's epistemology meshes pretty well with my pragmatic view of science: it is descriptive, within a particular framework and necessarily limited by experience. This view may be why I gravitated to the pragmatists in my epistemology course (Peirce, James, Rorty), or perhaps the pragmatists persuaded me better than the others.

In any case, the Gleiser interview is a delightful and interesting read throughout. His humble of science may get you thinking about epistemology, too.

... and, yes, that's the person for whom a quine in programming is named. Thanks to Douglas Hofstadter for coining the term and for giving us programming nuts a puzzle to solve in every new language we learn.

Posted by Eugene Wallingford | Permalink | Categories: Computing, General, Patterns, Personal

March 04, 2018 11:07 AM

A Seven-Year Itch

Seven years ago, I went out for my last run. I didn't know at the time that it would be my last run. A month or so later, I noted that I had been sick for a couple of weeks and then sore for a couple of weeks. After another four weeks, I reported that my knee wasn't going to get better in a way that would enable me to run regularly again. That was it.

My knee is better now in most important ways, though. A simple fix wasn't possible, but a more involved surgery was successful. Today, I walk a lot, especially with my wife, ride a bike a lot, again especially with my wife, and otherwise live a normal physical life. The repaired knee is not as mobile or responsive as my other knee but, all things considered, life is pretty good.

Even so, I miss running. A couple of years ago, I wrote that even five years on, I still dreamed about running occasionally. I'll be up early some morning, see a sunrise, and think, "This would make for a great run." Sometimes, when I go out after a snowfall, I'll remember what it was like to be the first person running on fresh snow out on the trails, under ice- or snow-covered branches. I miss that feeling, and so many others. I still enjoy sunrises and new snow, of course, but that enjoyment has long been tangled up with the feel of running: the pumping lungs, the long strides, the steady flow of scenery. Walking and biking have never given me the same feeling.

My orthopedic surgeon was worried that I would be like a lot of former runners and not stay "former", but I've been pretty well-behaved. In seven years I have rarely broken into even the slowest of trots, to cross a street or hurry to class. The doctor explained to me the effects of running on my reconstructed knee, the risk profile associated with contact sports, and what contact would likely mean for the future of the knee. As emotional I can seem about running, I'm much too rational to throw caution out the door for a brief thrill of running. So I don't run.

Even so, I often think back to the time I was rehabilitating my knee after surgery. Our athletic department has a therapy pool with an underwater treadmill, and my therapist had me use it to test my endurance and knee motion. The buoyancy of the water takes enough pressure off the legs that the impact on the knee doesn't damage the joint. I think I can achieve the same effect in the ocean, so the next time I get to a coast, I may try an underwater run. And I dream of getting rich enough to install one of those therapy pools in my house. I may not be a runner anymore, but I'm adaptable and perfectly willing to enjoy the benefits of technology.

Posted by Eugene Wallingford | Permalink | Categories: Personal, Running